The Last Trapper

Genre:  Documentary
Running Time:  100 min.
Release Date: March 17, 2006 (limited)
DVD: November 21, 2006

Current rating: Rating: 4.57
based on 337 votes and 23 reviews
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Synopsis

On an incredible Canadian "White Odyssey" crossing 8,600 kilometers by dog-driven sled from Alaska to Quebec, filmmaker Nicolas Vanier met Norman, a modern-day Jeremiah Johnson—a Davy Crockett for a world that has forgotten its past.

Norman, 50, lives in the Yukon woods with a Nahanni Indian woman named Nebraska. A long-time trapper, he doesn’t need society's luxuries. He has his dogs and he eats what he hunts or fishes. He handmade his sled, his rackets, his hut and his canoe with the wood he gets from the forest. Leather is tanned by Nebraska for him in the old way, as the ancient Sekani Indians did.

Hunting lynxes, beavers, martens, wolves and wolverines provides the rest. Each spring, he goes to Whitehorse or Dawson to sell furs and buy sundries: cigarette tobacco, ammunition, traps, flour, matches, candles and batteries for his radio. He travels with his dogs. They are silent and allow him to gaze undisturbed at the majestic landscapes he crosses. That is what makes Norman trap. The Great North is in him, and Nebraska carries it with her, in her blood, because the boreal forest is her people's mother.

The audience gets a day-to-day portrait of a pure spirit, existing in accord with his environment, and living respectfully off the lives of fellow creatures.

Director: Nicolas Vanier
Studio: Christal Films
Producer(s): Jean-Pierre Bailly
Screenplay: Nicolas Vanier
Official Site: www.christalfilms.com/officialsites/lederniertrappeur/

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User Reviewsread all

  • 5 stars "its a pretty good movie"
  • 1 star ""i am close to 6o years of age and did trap weasels muskrat and beaver and snare rabbits for bait,when i was in my early years in n.e. saskatchewan. i can sympathise with the bitter cold as frozen fingers and toes were common then." Yes, you certainly wouldn't want to sympathize with the beavers and rabbits who must have suffered long and agonizing deaths ensnared in your traps..."
  • 5 stars "we watched the movie with my 6 year old grandson,he keeps asking to watch it again.i am close to 6o years of age and did trap weasels muskrat and beaver and snare rabbits for bait,when i was in my early years in n.e. saskatchewan. i can sympathise with the bitter cold as frozen fingers and toes were common then. Great movie."
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